That’s what it’s looking like, more so with each primary. But the Clinton campaign assures that it will be.

Bottom line: Say hello Puerto Rico.

“We are going to fight all the way to the convention,” Ickes said.

[Harold] Ickes, a veteran of the Clinton White House and a central
figure in Clinton’s 2000 Senate race, told reporters that the campaign
expects Clinton “will able to hold her own in Wisconsin” and win Texas,
Ohio and Rhode Island. “We think the demographics of Pennsylvania very
much suits her candidacy,” he said. “By the end of this process by the
7th of June, when Puerto Rico votes, she will be neck and neck with Mr.
Obama . . . Then she will wrap up the nomination.”

That is called two things: wishful thinking, and spin. Here’s more of the same:

Ickes was quick to note that “superdelegates,” the more
than 790 Democratic elected officials and party leaders who may well
determine the eventual nominee, should be referred to as “automatic
delegates,” complaining that the word “super” has “some sort of sense
that they’re going to descend to us from Mars.” (”The fourth estate,”
he added, “invented the name ’superdelegates.’”)

Funny, the Clinton team never said a word when they controlled the
message of “the fourth estate” – the media. But the Clinton team is not
used to not controlling the message.

Noting recent comments by Howard Dean, chair of the
Democratic National Committee, David Axelrod, Sen. Barack Obama’s chief
strategist and Rep. Jim Clyburn, the House Majority Whip– and
side-stepping comments made by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi — Ickes
asserted that automatic delegates should exercise “their best judgment
in the interests of the party and the country” in choosing their
nominee.

That’s sort of a threat.

This remains a race headed for a showdown at the conventions. And this is only on the Democrats’ side.

The Republicans have their own dramatic story.

Sheila Liaugminas

Sheila Liaugminas is an Emmy award-winning Chicago-based journalist in print and broadcast media. Her writing and broadcasting covers matters of faith, culture, politics and the media....