A New
Zealand study
shows that young adults find it easier to relate to their
mothers than their fathers. Even for a generation born in the late 1980s when
more mothers were going out to work, mums are still the softies and dads the no-nonsense
providers — more ready to give advice than to listen.

Otago University professor Amanda Barusch quizzed more than 1400 Kiwis aged
18 to 25 to study the relationships between adult children and their parents.
She found clear differences between how they viewed their mums and dads.

The five most statistically significant were that mothers were more likely
to be perceived to give their children unconditional love, be honest and frank,
sacrifice their own comfort and be a friend to their children.

In contrast, fathers were more likely to disagree with their children.

Well, someone needs to disagree with them:

“You threw in your job? How do you expect to live?”

“You are moving in with that guy? He only wants one thing…”

Still, it looks as though dads could be a bit more laid back
with their adult kids — and mums, maybe, a little tougher.

Carolyn Moynihan

Carolyn Moynihan is the former deputy editor of MercatorNet