Overhwhelming odds are that you didn’t, even if you live in the
state of Illinois, where the landmark decision came down last week.

The story, a small piece, was buried on page 11 of the Chicago Tribune the next day.

A federal appeals court in Chicago on Tuesday breathed
new life into a long-dormant Illinois law that requires physicians to
notify the parents of teenage girls before performing abortions.

Attorneys on both sides of the issue said the law — which was passed
in 1984 and updated in 1995 — would take effect within weeks unless its
critics ask for a stay and the three-judge panel of the 7th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals agrees to put its order on hold pending a
rehearing.

Anti-abortion activists applauded the appeals court’s decision as a
long-overdue victory, while opponents of the law said the measure was
guaranteed to usher in dangerous problems.

“It’s about time the law was approved,” said Thomas Brejcha,
president of the Thomas More Society, which fought to have the measure
enforced. “It’s ridiculous that it took this long to get a decision.”

For the first time since Roe v. Wade, Illinois parents will be
entitled to notification before their minor daughters are taken for
abortions. This is no small victory.

“This is an incredible victory for Illinois parents and
their children,” said Peter Breen, Executive Director and Legal Counsel
of the Thomas More Society.  “Parental involvement laws enjoy
overwhelming public support.  These laws promote the integrity of the
family and ensure that parents are consulted so that their children are
not forced into an abortion decision.  A wealth of social science data
indicates that parental involvement laws lead to lower pregnancy rates,
out-of-wedlock births and abortions.”

The Obama administration repeatedly insists their goal is to reduce
the need for abortions. President Obama also urges families to be more
involved with their children, and men to realize ‘fatherhood doesn’t
end at conception.’

No logical, reasonable and most of all, truthful argument can be made against parental notice (and the main one opponents try is already covered in this ruling). This is yet another opportunity to see who’s really for choice on this issue…..and who’s fighting to keep information from those making one.

Sheila Liaugminas

Sheila Liaugminas is an Emmy award-winning Chicago-based journalist in print and broadcast media. Her writing and broadcasting covers matters of faith, culture, politics and the media....