That little community is Lithuania right now. Together with Ireland
and Italy and communities scattered in Spain and several other nations,
they’re holding fast to the values that have held civilization together throughout history.

“The new legislation, adopted by the parliament in Vilnius on
December 22, eliminates a clause banning the promotion among minors of
“homosexual, bisexual, and polygamous relations”, replacing it with a
ban on public information “that encourages [any type of] sexual
relations among minors that denigrates family values or that promotes
any concept of marriage and the family other than that defined in the
Lithuanian Constitu tion and Code of Civil Law” (which states that
marriage is between a man and a woman). The amendments also make clear
that the legal restrictions apply to education, the media, advertising
and all other types of public information.”

This is not complicated. And it’s not ‘homophobic’, a charge intended to intimidate.

In fact, it’s a stand for reason.

“The chair of the Lithuanian parliament, Irena Degutiene, hopes that
the values on which Lithuania has chosen to base its family and social
policy might become an example for other European nations. “Lithuania
is a European state that holds to traditional ethical values which it
has no intention of abandoning,” Degutienė said in a statement. “Going
against the flow of strict cultural and ethical libertarianism in the
European Union is not popular. But I am convinced that by resisting the
sometimes insistent pressure to forsake principles and values with a
proven ability to guide the life of society, we in fact will come out
the winners.”

The “proven ability” is key for society, and civilization.

Sheila Liaugminas

Sheila Liaugminas is an Emmy award-winning Chicago-based journalist in print and broadcast media. Her writing and broadcasting covers matters of faith, culture, politics and the media....