The book Cinderella Ate My Daughter is getting a lot of press these days. Written by a feminist, who admits to being determined to raise an independent daughter who wouldn’t be cowed by society’s thoughts of what a girl should be, the book is her personal journey to discover what it is about the princess culture that is so attractive to the younger generation of girls and if that is hurting the generation to come.

I never really went through the princess stage. Sure, I’ve seen all the Disney movies and have my favorites, but I was never floating around the house in a pink tutu thinking my prince would come charging up on a white horse to take me away to eternal bliss.

But is it really so bad if a girl today identifies with princesses? Aren’t there lessons to be learned even from the gown-clad lovelies that sing, dance and converse with animals?

Take Cinderella for example. She is kind. Even when her step-sisters demand she fix their clothes and her step-mother punishes her to more chores, she doesn’t complain or cry about it. She gets to work and doesn’t utter a bad word against any of them.

Or how about Belle from Beauty and the Beast? She is able to see the beauty within, overlooking the exterior hideousness of the man-turned-beast in front of her. When everyone else around her is superficial or narcissistic she is thinking of others.

Even the modern princess – Tiana of the Princess and the Frog – is strong, ambitious and driven. She has a goal and has worked hard every day of her life to fulfill her dream. She’s an entrepreneur.

Aren’t these virtues we want the current generation of little ones to espouse? Wouldn’t out world be a better place with women who grow up to be more kind, compassionate, driven and people-focused?

 

Katie Hinderer

Katie Hinderer is a freelance writer and social media enthusiast. She holds a degree in Journalism from Marquette University. Over the years she has transitioned from traditional publishing...