Television coverage on primary night turned out some interesting moments.

Sen. John McCain came out early with his victory speech and may have
found a new campaign slogan. On the goal of making America safe, McCain
wound it up with this: “We can, we must….and when I’m president, we
WILL.” Seems to be a sustainable counter to Obama’s “we CAN.”

Hillary Clinton came out on stage in Youngstown, Ohio and started a
speech without even mentioning Wisconsin, which she’s done before when
she lost. But she started slow, and seemed adrift, and searched for
words to prompt applause and shore up….herself, I think. She seemed
weary. The text doesn’t quite convey the weariness.

“We can’t just have speeches. We’ve got to have
solutions and we need those solutions for America. We’ve got to get
America back in the solutions business.” 

And as she was talking, Fox suddenly went to a split screen,
with Clinton on the left and the Obama rally on the right, with the
senator just entering the Texas arena where his fans were cheering
exuberantly. Interesting moment…..what will the network do now? Stay
with Clinton’s speech, or go to Obama’s?

They went to Obama’s. And that interesting moment turned into about
45 minutes….had to be the longest candidate ‘victory’ speech on a
primary night….ever. It seemed endless. Not that it wasn’t inspiring as
usual. But it’s just so usual now, and so prolonged a version of the
usual (did anybody count the number of times he said the
word ”change”?), that it almost sounded cliche.

But the cable networks stayed with all 45 minutes of it, giving Obama some valuable free broadcast time to campaign. Here’s a snip:

“It is going to take more than big rallies. It is going
to require more than rousing speeches … it is going to require
something more because the problem that we face in America today is not
the lack of good ideas. It’s that Washington has become a place where
good ideas go to die,” he said.

Just a reminder. Sen. Obama is part of Washington. In fact, all
three senators running right now are part of what’s not working in
Washington, namely Congress.

Sooner or later, we’re going to have to get to the issues. Please.

Sheila Liaugminas

Sheila Liaugminas is an Emmy award-winning Chicago-based journalist in print and broadcast media. Her writing and broadcasting covers matters of faith, culture, politics and the media....