People can agree on the fundamental principles of civil rights,
respect for human dignity and the existence of – and need to protect
– universal human rights. But the definition of what behaviors which
groups of humans fall into the categories of protected rights is
changing all the time. So rapidly, in fact, the lines have gone from
blurred to indistinguishable in some areas. Like bioethics, for example.

That’s where the film Lines That Divide comes in to play.

Lines that Divide, produced by Biola University Chair of Cinema and
Media Arts, Jack Hafer, looks into the scientific basics of stem cell
research and the political issues surrounding it while asking
significant questions such as if the end justifies the means.

The critically-needed film has already produced rave reviews.

“Lines That Divide is a much-needed tool for equipping concerned
citizens with a comprehensive view of the science and ethics shaping
the stem cell debate today,” says Chuck Colson of Prison fellowship.

“The film spotlights the breakthroughs being made by adult stem cell
therapy — breakthroughs which are not receiving equal funding or equal
media coverage. Al of us who believe in supporting life should see this
film and recommend it to others,” he added.

John Cusey, the former top staffer for the House Pro-Life Caucus in Congress, also highly recommends the film.

“If you are looking for an antidote to the confusion surrounding the
science and ethics of embryo stem cell research, Lines That Divide is
the movie for you. It cuts through the hype and leaves you with the
facts to be able to make informed policy decisions,” he says.

That’s good. Present the facts and let people have a fully informed
public debate about social policy. This should be the operating
principle behind all kinds of issues being hammered out in politics and
the culture.

But at least it is here.

Sheila Liaugminas

Sheila Liaugminas is an Emmy award-winning Chicago-based journalist in print and broadcast media. Her writing and broadcasting covers matters of faith, culture, politics and the media....