A few weeks ago, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) announced it is venturing further than ever before in its quest to establish “gender equality” by committing no less than US$2.1 billion to the endeavour — more than half of which will be spent on contraceptives.

The Foundation, and Melinda Gates in particular, is well-known for its efforts towards sterilising as much of the female population as possible, particularly in Africa, India and other developing nations.

The remainder of the eye-watering sum will, according to the BMGF, be divided between accelerating “women’s inclusion in leadership roles” (however that works) and strengthening “women’s economic empowerment” by supporting “women’s empowerment collectives, strengthen[ing] the care economy, improv[ing] women’s financial inclusion, and reduc[ing] barriers to paid work” (whatever that means).

This is not the first time Melinda Gates has donated hefty sums towards pushing women out of the home and into the workplace.

In 2019, she pledged US$1 billion to expand “women’s power and influence in the United States”.

She loves throwing out broad, sweeping statements and philanthropic jargon without saying much of substance, that Melinda.

Her new press release is bursting with similar enthusiastic but meaningless statements like,

when women control their bodies and their futures, they unlock a cycle of empowerment that reverberates for generations to come

and

The world has been fighting for gender equality for decades, but progress has been slow. Now is the chance to reignite a movement and deliver real change

As an educated millennial, phrases like these sound embarrassingly archaic to me, not to mention cringeworthy as hell.

When I read such statements all I can think is, really? We’re still doing this? We’re still recycling outdated and debunked feminist narratives from the ’60s?

As everyone ought to know by now, since making their escape from the shackles of home life 60 years ago, women have become steadily more miserable, disillusioned and drug-dependent.

This fact was made inescapably clear in a 2009 University of Pennsylvania study, which found that women have been growing unhappier since – surprise, surprise – the early 1970s (a fact Elle magazine described as “perplexing”).

In her excellent 2019 book The Anti-Mary Exposed: Rescuing the Culture from Toxic Femininity, Dr Carrie Gress says,

…for all the so-called progress women have made, there is precious little evidence that any of it has actually made women happier. Divorce rates are still staggering, with 70 percent initiated by women; suicide rates are soaring; drug and alcohol abuse is unprecedented; STDs, particularly among women, are at epidemic levels, and depression and anxiety are everywhere. Women are not getting happier, just more medicated.

Turns out, most women are a lot happier being at home with their kids than working 80-hour weeks in corporate enterprises.

And yet we’re constantly treated to Melinda Gates and her ilk spitting with rage about the under-representation of Fortune 500 female CEOs – while never stopping to ask how many women actually care about becoming one — and babbling on about the “wage gap”, which has been debunked even by far-left publications like The Huffington Post.

But Melinda Gates’ most sacred cow — as it is for virtually all loud and annoying feminists — is abortion and, by extension, contraception.

The Gates’ obsession with these pillars of progressivism goes back decades. Their recent press release proudly states they have been fighting for “family planning” (read: abortion) and “women’s health” (read: contraception) for 20 years. The Gates Foundation is even funding an online “Contraceptive Symposium” this month.

The family planning page on the BMGF website gives a lengthy account of their strategies and goals for “enabling women to make informed decisions about whether and when to have children”, complete with photos of Foundation reps talking to people from impoverished countries, as an alleged means of tackling poverty.

However, as Nigerian pro-life activist Obianuju Ekeocha points out, most African women are far more interested in having access to basic commodities like food, water and an education than in contraception.

A little further digging into the Gates’ history yields some surprising results.

For one thing, the United Nations Population Fund awarded their 2010 Population Award to the BMGF, with executive director Thoraya Obaid citing the Foundation as a “leader in the fields of global health and global development, particularly in promoting excellence in population assistance, including through the design of innovative, integrated solutions in the areas of reproductive health, family planning, and maternal and neonatal health”.

For another, Bill said in his now-infamous 2010 TED talk that,

The world today has 6.8 billion people. That’s headed up to about nine billion. Now, if we do a really great job on new vaccines, health care, reproductive health services, we could lower that by, perhaps, 10 or 15 percent.

I won’t go into speculation about the relation between this and the Gates-funded Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine. My point here is that he makes clear his Malthusian mindset that the world would be better off with less people.

And it’s no secret that the best way to achieve this is through sterilisation via contraception, or infanticide through abortion (that and keeping women out of the home and in the workplace).

China is our clearest and most recent example of this — to disastrous effect. They’ve finally begun to realise that their ageing population is becoming so top-heavy, they will soon end in economic and social collapse — hence the repeal of the one-child policy.

Ours is a sick society that values big salaries and high-flying careers over stable families and the lives of innocent children. Only a diseased social mind could come up with the “pussy hat” and the “shout your abortion” trend.

I fear that we will only spiral faster into this toxic morass unless we reject the Malthusianism of people like Bill and Melinda Gates and promote traditional families as the building blocks of society.

I’ve heard it suggested that the best thing we can do to rebuild our broken society is to get married and build large, stable families.

I know that, given the chance, that’s exactly what I’ll be doing.

Anna Hitchings

Anna Hitchings is a freelance writer based in Sydney.